New York Mesothelioma Lawyer

Prior to the 1980s, numerous companies and businesses across the entire of state New York used asbestos. Because of its fire and heat resistant properties, asbestos was used in shipyards, plants, refineries, and more. One the most highest uses of asbestos in New York was in the World Trade Center. When it was built during the late 60s and early 70s, asbestos insulation was sprayed throughout the buildings. When the towers fell in 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) stated that the amount of asbestos in the air was well above three times of the amount that’s acceptable.

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, asbestos-related lung cancer, or asbestosis, you may be entitled to substantial compensation. We invite you to fill out our form today for a free Financial Compensation Packet, filled with information about top mesothelioma lawyers in New York, how to get paid in 90 days, how to file an asbestos trust fund claim, and much more. 

New York State

We help all New York residents get the help and compensation they deserve, including:

Albany, Amsterdam, Auburn, Batavia, Beacon, Binghampton, Buffalo, Brookhaven, Islip, Kensginton, Liberty Village, West Haverstraw, New Paltz Village, Hempstead, Oyster Bay, Rochester, Huntington, Ramapo, Amherst, Smithtown, Greece, Greenburgh, Cheektowaga, Clarkstown, Colony,  Canandaigua, New Rochelle, Towanda, Schenectady, Clay, Cohoes, South Hampton, Hamburg, Hempstead Village, Irondequoit, Orangetown, Rye, Perington, West Seneca, Mount Pleasant, Webster, Henrietta, Freeport, Cortlandt, Lancaster, Monroe, Valley Stream, Ossining, Clifton Park, Penfield, Corning, Courtland, Dunkirk, Elmira, Fulton, Geneva, Glen Cove, Glens Fall, Gloversville, Hornell, Hudson, Ithaca, Jamestown, Johnstown, Kingston, Lackawanna, Little Falls, Lockport, Long Beach, Mechanicville, Middletown, Mount Vernon, New Rochelle, Bronx, Queens, New York City, Kings, Richmond, Newburgh, Niagra Falls, North Tonawanda, Norwich, Ogdensburg, Olean, Oneida, Oneonta, Oswego, Peekskill, Plattsburgh, Port Jevis, Poughkeepsie, Rensseelaer, Rochester, Rome, Rye, Salamanca, Saratoga Springs, Schenetady, Sherill, Syracuse, Troy, Utica, Watertown, Watervliet, White Plains, Yorktown, Carmel, Salina, Long Beach, Riverhead, Yonkers, and more.

Asbestos at New York Job Sites

There are close to 400 work sites in New York that have been associated with high asbestos usage. The majority of these sites are shipyards, breweries, school buildings, plants, office buildings, and hospitals.  These work sites are located all across the state in various cities:

Shipyards and Docks

  • U.S. Naval Shipyard
  • Brooklyn Naval Shipyard
  • Brooklyn Coastal Dry Dock
  • Bethlehem Steel Shipyard
  • New York Naval Shipyard

Breweries

  • Schaefer Brewery

Buildings

  • Empire State Building
  • Thruway Authority Building
  • Bankers Trust Office Building
  • Pan Am Building
  • Bausch & Lomb Building

Plants

  • Chevrolet Axle Plant
  • Ford Motor Stamping Plant
  • Sewage Disposal Plant
  • Harrison Radiator Plant
  • Glen Clove Power Plant
  • General Electric Plant
  • ALCOA Aluminum Plant
  • Carborundum Plant
  • R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant
  • Yorktown Sewage Plant
  • Schenectady Chemical Plant
  • American Locomotive Plant
  • Delco Plant

Schools

  • Saugerti High School
  • Baldwinsville High School
  • New York City Technical College
  • Bennett High School
  • Gowanda School
  • Mercyhurst College
  • Millcreek School
  • State University of New York
  • West Side High School (Corning)
  • Cortland Senior High School
  • Cornell University
  • Ithaca College

Hospitals and Nursing Homes

  • Amsterdam City Hospital
  • Genesee County Nursing Home
  • Southside Hospital
  • Bassett Hospital
  • Cortland Memorial Hospital
  • Mohawk Valley Nursing Home
  • St. Lukes Hospital
  • Long Island Jewish Medical Center
  • St. Lawrence State Hospital
  • Oneida City Hospital
  • Mather Hospital
  • Creedmoor Psychiatric Center
  • New York State Department of Mental Hygiene
  • Rockland State Hospital
  • Moses Ludington Hospital

Additional Businesses

  • Republic Steel
  • Western Electric
  • Star Textile
  • Dunlop Tire & Rubber
  • Radio City Music Hall
  • Plancor
  • Torrington Industries
  • Subway (New York City)
  • Rockefeller Center
  • Rochester Products
  • Star Textile
  • Linde Air Products Company
  • New Hyde Park Supply
  • Triangle Sheet Metal Workers
  • Clark Estates
  • International Milk Products Company
  • Cortland County Jail Buildings
  • Cortland County Traction Company
  • Cortland Wagon Company
  • Ekenberg Company
  • Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation
  • Dewitt Community Church
  • Transelco Inc.
  • Continental Can Company
  • Long Island Light Company
  • Garden City Hotel
  • Our Lady of the Angels Seminary

Asbestos in New York Today

Even though regulations in the late 70s required businesses to stop using asbestos, there are still several thousand New Yorkers exposed to asbestos even today. Close to 100,000 teachers, plumbers, engineers, electricians, and plumbers are still exposed to asbestos.

However, the difference today is that there are strict laws in place that require workers to only spend a limited amount of time around the dangerous fibers. New York workers cannot handle or investigate asbestos unless they are professionally certified. Additionally, all workers dealing with asbestos must wear protective clothing and have access to hygiene products.

Naturally-Occurring Asbestos in New York

Although rare, mesothelioma victims do not always contract the disease from worksites. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, the highest amount of mesothelioma deaths prior to 1981 happened in Jefferson County. Jefferson County is home to naturally-occurring asbestos deposits.

Statistics in New York

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there are 9.6 deaths per million people in New York each year. In addition, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) states that in 2006, there were 63 deaths per 100,000 people in New York from lung cancers.

  • From 1979 to 1991, over 3,000 New Yorkers died from asbestos cancer. These numbers could actually be much higher, yet not all deaths were calculated by the United States government until the 1990s.

  • In 1998, the United States government began tracking malignant mesothelioma deaths. In 1998, there were 235 asbestos-related deaths, but by 1999, the death rate increased to 2,343.

  • Queens, New York has had the most victims of asbestos with over 300 deaths. 228 of these deaths were from mesothelioma while over 60 were from asbestosis.

  • Following Queens, Nassau County, New York reported over 250 asbestos-related deaths, followed by Suffolk County who averaged over 244 deaths.

  • Bronx, New York has had the lowest rates of asbestos-related disease in the state so far, with 69 mesothelioma victims and 24 asbestosis victims.

  • According to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), New York is ranked 34th in the nation for mesothelioma deaths between 1999 through 2005.

  • The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation has helped New York fund research projects at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center,  Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and New York University.

New York Asbestos Laws

The New York Department of Labor’s Asbestos Control Bureau oversees and implements state and federal laws regarding asbestos abatement in the state of New York. As with every other state in the nation, these laws were put into place to help ensure safety while handling and working around asbestos:

  • Under Industrial Code Rule 56, anyone working on an asbestos abatement project in New York must first be licensed and certified to work around asbestos.
  • Before a large asbestos project can begin, New York’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) must be notified. Smaller residential projects, however, don’t need to filed prior to any projects. Any project that exceeds 10 square feet or 25 linear feet is considered to be a large project, therefore requiring notification.
  • The DEP reserves the right to inspect any large asbestos project at anytime.
  • Once asbestos projects are concluded, they must be closed out according to New York law, which includes the proper handling, removal, and disposal of asbestos.
  • All labels must be clear on the packaging of asbestos during the transport to one of the certified New York landfills.

For additional information and in-depth details of the New York asbestos laws, contact the New York Asbestos Control Bureau at 518-457-2735.

New York Statute of Limitations on Mesothelioma and Asbestos Lawsuits

N.Y. Civ. Prac. Laws & Rules § 201 et seq. mandates that plaintiffs who wish to file an asbestos-related lawsuit must so within the state’s statute of limitations, which is three years from the time the disease was diagnosed or within two years from the time in which it should have been reasonably discovered. For asbestos-related wrongful death cases, plaintiffs must file within two years of the actual date of the victim’s death. Even though the statute for these lawsuits are strict, New York is known as a “pro-victim” state in which millions have been awarded for asbestos lawsuits.

Getting Legal Help in New York

If you’ve been diagnosed with mesothelioma, asbestos-related lung cancer, or asbestosis, keep in mind that you may qualify for substantial financial compensation. Don’t forget to fill out our form to get our free Financial Compensation Packet, filled with information on the leading asbestos and mesothelioma attorneys in your areaFor questions and assistance, feel free to contact us at 800-793-4540. 

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